Planet MUNZ Local 10

Maritime Union of AustraliaMUA Press Alert: Iron Chieftain to leave Port Kembla

The Iron Chieftain will be leaving Port Kembla under tow for the long journey to its final resting place in Turkey. The Chieftain suffered irreparable damage after a fire on board in June last year. One of the last Iron ships with an Australian Crew before that fateful day.

Felixstowe DockersA container vessel, the Seaspan New Delhi, has been detained at Hutchison Terminal, Port Botany following an MUA safety blitz


A container vessel, the Seaspan New Delhi, has been detained at Hutchison Terminal, Port Botany following an MUA safety blitz. The union investigation uncovered serious safety and engineering deficiencies on the Hong Kong registered ship, including severe fall from height risks, inadequate fencing, rusted out walkways, busted hatch covers, and other safety breaches. Members will not be unloading this vessel for as long as it takes for remedial work to be completed, likely to be several days at least. More to follow



Matt Goodwin is in Port Botany, New South Wales, Australia.




Felixstowe DockersBiggest Crane Accidents! Crane Fails.





Published on 5 Feb 2019

Felixstowe DockersMajor boxship fire occurs every 60 days


Insurer TT Club is pushing for greater scrutiny of dangerous goods carriage onboard boxships, warning that there is now a major containership fire at sea on average every 60 days.
The first three months of this year have been far above the historical average with insurers bracing for massive claims from a series of high profile boxship fires in 2019.
TT Club’s records indicate that across the intermodal spectrum as a whole, 66% of incidents related to cargo damage can be attributed to poor practice in the overall packing process; that is not just in securing but also in cargo identification, declaration, documentation and effective data transfer. The calculated cost of these claims in the marine, aviation and transport insurance sector is in excess of $500m a year.
Peregrine Storrs-Fox, TT Club’s risk management director, has made repeated calls for the correct declaration and handling of dangerous goods.
ICHCA International, the cargo handling operatives association, has calculated that of the 60m packed containers moved each year, 10% or 6m are declared as dangerous goods. Information from published government inspections – which are invariably biased towards declared dangerous goods loads – suggests that 20% of these are poorly packed or incorrectly identified. This translates into 1.3m potentially unstable dangerous goods containers travelling around the world each year.
Storrs-Fox emphasized in a release yesterday that this scale of risk is elevated when undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods consignments are considered. “In these cases an estimate of volumes is more obscure. An indication has been given through the work of one container carrier, Hapag-Lloyd, developing a profiling algorithm to search its booking system for potential misdeclaration of commodities. Results from Cargo Patrol, when extrapolated to the carryings of all the lines, concludes a reasonable estimate in excess of 150,000 volatile containers in the supply chain each year.”
Containerlines are making efforts to mitigate the problem. The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS), in which many of the top lines participate, has been active for a number of years and has successfully identified a number of commodities that commonly cause problems during transport – not always limited to those formally identified as dangerous. TT Club has additionally promoted, together with UK P&I Club and Exis Technologies, the Hazcheck Restrictions Portal, which is designed to identify and streamline the complexity of regulations and protocols imposed by carriers and ports around the world in relation to transporting declared dangerous goods.
Storrs-Fox, who has been leading TT Club’s Cargo Integrity campaign, yesterday suggested legislative action, and greater enforcement and inspection are needed.


Felixstowe DockersCosco Shipping Denali breaks away from Trinity 7 with the assistance of two Svitzer tugs 25 03 19



https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKRRePXC8Ht1kPDQzoiaPmA



Published on 25 Mar 2019

Felixstowe DockersRTG Hoist Failure In Los Angeles

From friends on the ground, we're made to understand that a rubber tired gantry crane blew a hoist wire today at the FENIX Marine Services (ex Eagle Marine) terminal in Los Angeles.
Ostensibly, that caused the crane's spreader to drop like a rock... landing on an over-the-road driver's MT chassis (see photo below).
We're told that the driver was taken out of the facility in an ambulance, and we're thinking of his well being.



Ron Signorino

Felixstowe DockersThe Female Pioneers at Colombo Port (Part 2)


In the second instalment of a two-part feature, which began by introducing us to one of Asia’s youngest crane operators, guest author Nilantha Ilangamuwa further explores the lives and work of the extraordinary women working at the Port of Colombo.

Poojani, along with her colleagues Sewwandi, Harshani and Udeshikai (pictured above), represent the present stage of woman’s long journey for freedom. All of them have their own story and experiences to narrate.
Poojani said: “It was challenging at the beginning as many thought women were weak and would not be able to do what men were doing for decades.
“Especially in a place like a port: how could a woman handle skyscraping cranes, they questioned. But we must, first of all, thank the higher officials for making this revolutionary decision to recruit a group of females as crane operators in Colombo Port.”


Sri Lanka Ports Authority took the decision to ensure gender equality in the work place, allowing 25 females to join its training programme. In the end, 10 out of 25 remained. Subsequently, those female crane operators were deployed in the Jaya Container Terminal at the Port of Colombo.
“Our general target is to handle 25 to 30 containers per hour, so we are doing that,” Poojani commented, while levering a container.
As with any other field, the beginning for these women was a mixture of the excitement of winning and the fear of failing. Working as a gantry crane operator, while many others are looking at you, is indeed challenging.  
“I can proudly say we are playing an active part in enriching our country. When we learn that the port has become one of the best ports on Earth, we feel delighted recalling our contribution.”

Read more about Colombo Port: Sri Lanka and China Unite for Port Upgrade


Like many others working in Colombo Port, there is a long journey ahead for women like Poojani and her colleagues. Every drop of sweat from their hard labour is well-preserved, filling the pages of the Colombo Port’s history. 
Harshani, who hails from the Colombo suburb, also describes her experiences as a female crane operator, claiming that what she is doing is beyond her dreams.
“I never dreamt of this job, as it was classified only for men. But, when we were receiving the training, we slowly learned how to break the old myth of impossibilities. We were taught how to break the technical and ideological barriers established in this society.”
She added: “Many gentlemen here trained us, helped us, and immediately corrected us whenever we made mistakes. But in a very short period of time, we as female gantry crane operators proved our capability and efficiency just like other male colleagues. We are safe and we are proud.”

Colombo Harbour, Sri Lanka

Colombo Port, as one of the ancient ports on the earth, has witnessed many historical events. Located in a strategically valuable part of the Asian continent, the port occupies a significant space in the global supply chain.
These female crane operators are writing the new pages of Colombo Port’s rich history, as well as that of the maritime industry in their country.
Joining the discussion, Sewwandi and Udeshika shared their rich experiences of working as gantry crane operators. Both their fathers worked in the Colombo Port, so it is not a new place for them. But they never thought that they would one day be operating this high-rise crane.
Speaking of their occupation’s importance, the two said: “The gantry crane has already become an inevitable part of our life. I believe it is not an exaggeration to say that the home has become secondary to the gantry crane. Our world is here.”


On the wake of celebrating International Women’s Day – which took place on March 8, 2019 - these women are showing the world how to change the traditions for the betterment of mankind. They are involved with the very inception of new technology and innovations.
Ultimately, the world is changed not by those who obey and follow tradition, but those who are thinking differently and act differently with both compassion and discipline.
Their courage, self-belief, commitment, and bravery made it possible for these women to override barriers and become successful. It is indeed demonstrated by every step forward Poojani and her colleagues take.

Read more:


Felixstowe DockersNearly 500 People Winched to Safety as Stricken Cruise Ship Makes Port

Published in Oil Industry News on Sunday, 24 March 2019

Rescue services had airlifted 479 people to safety from a luxury cruise liner with engine trouble off the coast of Norway by Sunday morning and began towing the vessel to a nearby port.
The Viking Sky, with 1,373 passengers and crew on board, sent out a mayday signal on Saturday as it drifted towards land in the Norwegian Sea.
The airlift of passengers, many of them elderly, from the Viking Cruises ship by helicopter was halted on Sunday morning as two tugboats started steering the vessel towards the nearest port.
Founder and chairman of Viking Cruises, Norwegian billionaire Torstein Hagen, said he hoped the vessel would arrive at the port of Molde on Norway's west coast by Sunday afternoon.
"They've had a bit of a shocking experience," Hagen told Norwegian TV2 and other media after meeting passengers who had been hoisted one by one from the ship's deck in stormy weather.
"Most of our passengers are senior citizens ... imagine what it's like to hang there on that wire. It must be a terrible experience but they seem to have handled it very well," Hagen said.
The helicopters are on standby in case the captain decides to restart the airlift, the rescue service said.
The 915 passengers were mainly from the United States and Britain, the rescue services said. There were also Canadians and Australians on board, among others, the cruise company said.
Some 20 injured passengers had been taken to hospital, Viking Cruises said, while others had only minor injuries.
One was taken to St. Olav's Hospital in Trondheim and others were taken to local hospitals.
"Many have also been traumatized by the experience and need care when they arrive on shore," the Norwegian Red Cross said.
The ship has been able to restart three of its four engines on Sunday morning but still needed assistance.
The tugboats, one in front and the other behind, were towing the ship at 7 knots (13 kilometres per hour). The vessel is about 80 kms from Molde, Norway's maritime rescue service said.
Stormy weather conditions had improved by early Sunday, with winds down to 14 metres per second from 24 metres per second, the Norwegian Meteorological Institute said. The wind is expected to drop further during Sunday.
Images and video posted by passengers on social media showed furniture sliding around and panels falling from the ceiling as the vessel drifted in waves of up to eight metres (26 feet), and passengers earlier described the ordeal.
"We were having lunch when it began to shake. Window panes were broken and water came in. It was just chaos. The trip on the helicopter, I would rather forget. It was not fun," American passenger John Curry told public broadcaster NRK on Saturday.
The stretch of water known as Hustadvika and surrounding areas are known for fierce weather and shallow waters dotted with reefs.
Built in 2017, the Viking Sky is 227 metres long (745 feet) and 29 metres wide, the Viking Ocean Cruises website said.
"We all want to know how this could have happened," company chairman Hagen said. "I'm sure there will be plenty of time to point fingers at what could and should have been done, but that's for later."
"Something like this shouldn't happen, but it has."




Viking Sky Cruise Ship Arrives in Port After Near Disaster at Sea



viking sky reaches portViking Sky cruise ship arrives, after problems the ship got in the storm outside of Hustadvika, at Molde, Norway March 24,2019. NTB Scanpix/Svein Ove Ekornesvag via REUTERS

reuters logoBy Terje Solsvik OSLO, March 24 (Reuters) – A luxury cruise ship that had set sail with almost 1,400 passengers and crew aboard arrived at a port in Norway on Sunday after narrowly escaping disaster when its engines failed during a storm.
The Viking Sky sent out a mayday signal on Saturday as it drifted in rough waters in the Norwegian Sea to within 100 meters of land.
Rescue services airlifted 479 people, hoisting them one-by- one on to helicopters, before the weather subsided on Sunday and a tow could begin. Many of them were senior citizens.
A total of 1,373 people had started the voyage and about 900 people were still on board as the ship arrived at the port of Molde on Norway’s west coast.
“It was very nearly a disaster. The ship drifted to within 100 meters of running aground before they were able to restart one of the engines,” police chief Hans Vik, who heads the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre for southern Norway, told TV2.
“If they had run aground we would have faced a major disaster.”

Viking Sky in distressA cruise ship Viking Sky drifts towards land after an engine failure, Hustadvika, Norway March 23, 2019. Frank Einar Vatne/NTB Scanpix/via REUTERS

Built in 2017, the Viking Sky is 227 meters long (745 feet) and 29 meters wide, the Viking Ocean Cruises website said.
Founder and chairman of Viking Cruises, Norwegian billionaire Torstein Hagen, met some of those who had been airlifted.
“They’ve had a bit of a shocking experience,” Hagen told TV2 and other media after meeting passengers who had been winched from the deck in the storm.
“Most of our passengers are senior citizens…imagine what it’s like to hang there on that wire. It must be a terrible experience but they seem to have handled it very well,” Hagen said.

AIS ship tracking data shows just how close the ship came to land: 


viking sky aisViking Sky AIS as of 1826 UTC 23 March 2019. Courtesy MarineTraffic.com

The 915 passengers were mainly from the United States and Britain, the rescue services said. There were also Canadians and Australians on board, among others, the cruise company said.
Some 20 injured passengers had been taken to hospital, Viking Cruises said, while others had only minor injuries.
One was taken to St. Olav’s Hospital in Trondheim and others were taken to local hospitals.
“Many have also been traumatized by the experience and need care when they arrive on shore,” the Norwegian Red Cross said.

BROKEN WINDOWS

Stormy weather conditions had improved by Sunday afternoon, with winds down to 12 meters per second from 24 meters per second, the Norwegian Meteorological Institute said.
Images and video posted by passengers on social media showed furniture sliding around and panels falling from the ceiling as the vessel drifted in waves of up to eight meters (26 feet), and passengers earlier described the ordeal.

“We were having lunch when it began to shake. Window panes were broken and water came in. It was just chaos. The trip on the helicopter, I would rather forget. It was not fun,” American passenger John Curry told public broadcaster NRK on Saturday.
British passenger Derek Brown told newspaper Romsdal Budstikke:
“I was a bit alarmed saying help, what’s going to happen to the boat? What’s going to happen to all of our possessions … is the boat liable to capsize, sink or what? We didn’t know so we were quite frightened.”
The stretch of water known as Hustadvika and surrounding areas are known for fierce weather and shallow waters dotted with reefs.
“We all want to know how this could have happened,” company chairman Hagen said. “I’m sure there will be plenty of time to point fingers at what could and should have been done, but that’s for later.”
“Something like this shouldn’t happen, but it has.” (Additional reporting by Gwladys Fouche Editing by Keith Weir and Angus MacSwan)
(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2019.

Related Story: Cruise Ship with 1,300 People On Board in Distress Off Norway



Felixstowe DockersDockworkers battle plan to bring driverless trucks to the Port of Los Angeles

Union members gather at the Port of Los Angeles during a Harbor Commission hearing over whether to allow APM, which operates the world's biggest terminal, to use driverless electric cargo vehicles. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

A fierce struggle over automation has erupted at the Port of Los Angeles, as local union officials representing some 12,000 dockworkers demand that one of the world’s largest shipping firms abandon a plan to introduce driverless electric cargo trucks.
Shouting, whistling and jeering, more than 1,200 union members, local business owners and community activists packed a four-hour hearing Thursday before the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners. The board voted to postpone a construction permit for the automated system after an offer by Mayor Eric Garcetti to mediate the dispute.
“The decision before the board may have far-reaching impacts on the pace of automation at our port and could define how the port will compete and sustain jobs into the foreseeable future,” Garcetti wrote in a letter unveiled at the hearing.
The mayor called for a 28-day delay in deciding on the permit, adding that negotiations “should serve as the basis of a new task force to explore automation and its impacts on the future of the Port of Los Angeles and others across the state.”
Port automation dates to the 1960s, when dockworker unions agreed to the introduction of containers, and consequent job losses, in exchange for higher pay and benefits. Today a typical full-time Southern California longshore worker earns more than $100,000 a year. But thousands of so-called “casuals,” who are not yet registered union members, earn far less, are eligible only for part-time hours, and do not yet get health or retirement benefits.
A 2008 International Longshore and Warehouse Union contract, renewed in 2015, explicitly allowed West Coast ports to continue automating. Two large terminals — one at the Port of Long Beach and one in Los Angeles — have already introduced the driverless vehicles known as UTRs, or utility tractor rigs.
But automation at the 484-acre facility operated for Denmark’s Moller-Maersk by APM Terminals is prompting an uproar from local union members who are having second thoughts about the current contract and believe the permit will lead to automation across all 12 of the port complex’s terminals.

Utility tractor rig driver Amber Guido, 39, opposes the automation of cargo transportation.
Utility tractor rig driver Amber Guido, 39, opposes the automation of cargo transportation. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)
The struggle comes as Los Angeles and Long Beach, the busiest ports in the nation, are enjoying record cargo traffic, despite the threat of an escalating trade war with China. The twin ports handle a third of U.S. container traffic, but they have lost market share to facilities along the Gulf of Mexico and, since the widening of the Panama Canal, along the East Coast.
APM officials decline to say how many jobs will be eliminated if what they call “self-guided container handling equipment” is introduced. Union officials say hundreds are at stake. One in nine jobs in the five-county region is linked to commerce flowing through the port complex, according to port officials.
APM characterizes its proposed automated, battery-powered vehicles, which would replace diesel-fueled rigs, as a response to the port’s clean air rules. But union officials say APM could introduce manned electric vehicles instead.
“This proposal is not about clean air and streamlining business practices,” Mark Mendoza, president of ILWU Local 13 told the five-member commission. “It is about Maersk maximizing their profits at all costs.… It will ultimately ensure the economic demise of the Southern California region.”
Port staff members have recommended approving APM’s permit request to install infrastructure to support the automated vehicles, along with scaffolding for containers and an upgraded Wi-Fi system. Economic impact is not part of the permit process, which falls under the port’s coastal land-use plan, port officials said.
The permit “is in compliance with the port’s master plan and the California Coastal Act,” said Eugene Seroka, the port’s executive director.
Maersk attorney Peter Jabbour said at the hearing that “there is no legal basis” for the union’s opposition to granting the permit. The company proposes only “minor infrastructure changes to the terminal, with no adverse environmental impacts. Objections to automation are not part of the coastal development process.”

Hundreds of union members and community members from San Pedro and Wilmington show their opposition to automation during a Harbor Commission meeting.
Hundreds of union members and community members from San Pedro and Wilmington show their opposition to automation during a Harbor Commission meeting. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)
James McKenna, president and chief executive of the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents 70 port companies, accused Local 13 of making “an end run around the current Pacific Coast Longshore contract, the federally governed collective bargaining process that led to it, as well as the ILWU’s democratic election that resulted in its ratification.”
Nonetheless, political pressure is building to halt the automation expansion.
“Robots do not pay taxes,” Local 13 Vice President Gary Herrera told the hearing, as hundreds in the audience rose to their feet applauding and yelling approval. “Robots do not shop in our communities. Robots do not vote!”
Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn urged the board to block the automation plan, saying, “I support reduced pollution, but we do not need to automate to achieve it.” She added that the ports “are prime targets for terrorism. Our dockworkers are the first line of defense. There’s nothing like a pair of human eyes and ears.”
City Councilman Joe Buscaino alluded pointedly to the fact that the City Council has the power to overturn any commission decision.
“We should work together, so this doesn’t have to come to the City Council, but I will exercise that option if needed,” he said. “We need a green and efficient port while preserving jobs.”

Mark Mendoza, center, president of ILWU Local 13, spoke at a Harbor Commission hearing over whether to allow APM to use driverless electric cargo vehicles.
Mark Mendoza, center, president of ILWU Local 13, spoke at a Harbor Commission hearing over whether to allow APM to use driverless electric cargo vehicles. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)
Two congresswomen, and more than a dozen state senators and Assembly members, including Speaker Anthony Rendon, along with seven neighborhood councils in San Pedro and Wilmington, and the Los Angeles Democratic Party wrote letters expressing reservations or outright opposition to the automation plan, calling for the preservation of jobs.
The fact that the ILWU, which represents 30 ports along the U.S. and Canadian Pacific coasts and in Panama, agreed to automation in past contracts is often contrasted with the stance of the International Longshoremen’s Assn., which represents East Coast dockworkers.
In October, under a six-year extension of their contract, East Coast terminals agreed not to automate.
In Southern California, dockworkers disrupted port traffic for months in 2014 and 2015, and officials have counted on the 2017 ratification of an extension of the ILWU contract through 2022 to guarantee labor stability.
Some 40 ports around the world have spent about $10 billion to install some form of automation. But overall, ports have been slower to automate than many industrial sectors such as mining, auto manufacturing and warehousing.
Speakers at the hearing noted that a 2018 McKinsey & Co. report, “The Future of Automated Ports,” raised questions as to whether the high upfront cost of automation is likely to be recouped by shipping firms. More automation is on the way, McKinsey reported, but executives interviewed for the report found that automated ports, especially fully automated ones, are generally less productive than their conventional counterparts.


Felixstowe DockersStunning pictures of Ephesus Seaways’ first arrival in Trieste


Ephesus Seaways arriving at the Trieste terminal
Yesterday, Ephesus Seaways completed her maiden voyage and arrived with 450 trailers at the Trieste terminal in Italy. And she was suitably greeted by a welcoming committee with Jens Peder Nielsen, our MD in Trieste, and Samer & Co Shipping executives, the Mayor of Trieste together with government and port authority representatives.

In place to welcome Ephesus Seaways on her first arrival in Trieste were: (From left) Jens Peder Nielsen, MD of Samer Seaports & Terminals; Antonio Gurrieri, Trieste Port Authority; Pierpaolo Roberti, Regional Government; Enrico Samer, President & CEO, Samer & Co Shipping; Capt. Hasan Can Gümüş, Master of Ephesus Seaways; Roberto Dipiazza, Mayor of Trieste; and Lilli Samer, CFO Samer & Co Shipping.
“All the teams in Trieste, especially the operations team, were really excited to welcome her. Having such a colossal ship operating at a terminal takes a lot of preparation, and in Trieste infrastructure improvement is already in progress to fully accommodate the ferry’s unique ramp system,” Jens Peder Nielsen says.

Trieste terminal stevedores unloading Ephesus Seaways
“When I finally saw the ferry up close, it fully lived up to my expectations of how grand she is, and I am definitely looking forward to seeing what benefits she will bring, not only DFDS, but also to the customers using her service. Hopefully Ephesus will be really busy on the route where her capacity is surely welcome,” Jens Peder says.
Thank you to Samer & Co. Shipping for sharing the pictures with us.

Spectacular shot of Trieste and Ephesus Seaways. Does anyone need a new desktop wallpaper?

Ephesus Seaways and UND Atilim in Trieste

The best kind of view


Felixstowe DockersHAPAG-LLOYD CUSTOMER OF ECT FOR 50 YEARS!


From the very beginning of container handling in 1968 to today's global container industry: the 23rd of October 2018 marks Hapag-Lloyd’s 50th anniversary as a customer of Hutchison Ports ECT Rotterdam.
On the 23rd of October 1968, the Weser Express of Hapag-Lloyd called at the ECT terminal in the Eemhaven for the very first time. The container industry was still in its absolute infancy. In Rotterdam, ECT had been operating its own terminal dedicated to the then-new phenomenon of the container for just over a year (August 1967). Among the shipping lines, Hapag-Lloyd was the first European carrier to have four container ships built in Hamburg for a regular service between Western Europe and the east coast of North America. The ships had a length of 171 metres and a capacity of 736 TEU. The Weser Express was the first to visit Rotterdam.

LARGE, LARGER, LARGEST

Nowadays, Hapag-Lloyd operates a fleet of 226 own vessels and transports nearly 10 million TEU worldwide. 600 ports are served by means of 120 liner services. On average, the ECT Delta in Rotterdam receives four of the shipping line’s deepsea vessels a week; this includes Hapag-Lloyd’s largest ships, which measure 400 metres in length and have a capacity of 19,870 TEU. Furthermore, cargo of Hapag-Lloyd sails aboard the ships of its partners in THE Alliance, ONE and Yang Ming, as well.

LOYAL PARTNER

Despite the massive increase in scale, the one thing that hasn’t changed over the years is the loyal attitude of Hapag-Lloyd towards partners like ECT. “The same holds true regarding its own employees,” says Tom Demolder (50), Managing Director Hapag-Lloyd Benelux for the last four years but working for the German shipping line for his entire career already. “Once upon a time, I started out in Antwerp cleaning containers.”

PRICE, PRODUCTIVITY AND FLEXIBILITY

“A well-run terminal combines attractive rates with productivity and flexibility,” continues the Managing Director. “Ultimately, it is all about the combination. A low price is pointless if the ship next stays at the quay too long. We are satisfied with the productivity of ECT. The operation is a well-oiled machine.” Flexibility is also essential. “Sometimes a ship arrives too late and sometimes it needs to depart early: that’s just the way it is.” What Demolder finds difficult to understand is the continuing congestion in Rotterdam (and Antwerp) for both inland shipping and feeders. “All parties involved are looking at this from their own perspectives. The sector must work together on a real solution. Looking at the bigger picture can result in a win-win situation for everyone.”
Hapag-Lloyd itself is a frequent user of inland shipping, partly also via European Gateway Services. “As a shipping line, we provide door-to-door services. For our hinterland transport in the Benelux and Germany, we mainly opt for inland navigation, although we are increasingly looking at rail as well. From an environmental point of view, road transport is not something we promote.”

JOINT CUSTOMER JOURNEY

To discover further potential improvements in the terminal’s service provision, Hapag-Lloyd and ECT embarked on a joint customer journey in May 2018. According to Demolder, one appealing example of that process is the dual cycling proposed by ECT: unloading and loading a container on board of a vessel in one single crane cycle. “This can significantly boost productivity and should benefit both the terminal and the shipping line.”
Dual cycling does not happen automatically and brings with it specific requirements for stowage. “It is good to note that ECT employees have been to Hamburg for consultation with our central planners. Dual cycling requires time and energy from both sides,” concludes Demolder. “The entire customer journey process stimulates us to keep on thinking. On the part of both ECT and Hapag-Lloyd, I see a great willingness to further invest in our relationship.”
Baptism of the ship 'Al-Jmeliyah' of Hapag Lloyd on September 11th 2018 on the ECT Delta


Felixstowe DockersTriple collision of US/German container ships in Yokohama UPDATE PHOTOS


UPDATE: Confirmed the ships involved in accident were correctly identified by Maritime Bulletin/FleetMon in initial news. According to latest news, APL GUAM after collision with MARCLIFF hit HANSA STENBURG, see photos below.
Triple collision between container ships reportedly occurred at Yokohama Anchorage off Nonmoku Terminal, at around 2330 Tokyo time Mar 21. Local sources didn’t identify ships, including their types, and mentioned only their flags. Antigua-flagged ship, according to local sources, struck anchored USA-flagged ship, and later, Liberia-flagged ship, also anchored.


According to AIS tracks, three container ships were involved. Antigua-flagged MARCLIFF has just left Yokohama Nonmoku, bound for Nagoya, and collided with USA-flagged APL GUAM, which was either approaching port or dropping anchor, it’s unclear. After separating from APL GUAM, MARCLIFF collided with, or contacted, anchored HANSA STEINBURG.

All three ships, as of 1500 UTC Mar 22, were at anchor on Yokohama anchorage, no information on damages, except that “there was no spill”, so planet is safe, I guess. I mean, are ships’ damages less important than oil spills? Nowadays, it’s oil spill/no spill first, the rest goes second. Insane.

Container ship MARCLIFF, IMO 9343663, dwt 13400, capacity 1043 TEU, built 2007, flag Antigua, manager MARCONSULT SCHIFFAHRT GMBH (EQUASIS and AIS).
Container ship APL GUAM, IMO 9229609, dwt 16418, capacity 1078 TEU, built 2001, flag USA.
Container ship HANSA STEINBURG, IMO 9436094, dwt 23285, capacity 1740 TEU, built 2010, flag Liberia, manager LEONHARDT & BLUMBERG SHIPMGMT.

My name is Mikhail Voytenko, I’m Russian, professional merchant marine navigator, by education and former experience. I own and run Maritime Bulletin website for more than 10 years. I've been involved in solving a number of piracy hijack cases, including the hijack of ro-ro FAINA, loaded with tanks. It was me who made public, and unravel, freighter ARCTIC SEA mystery. I've been also closely involved in a number of maritime disaster, one of them being MSC FLAMINIA major fire.

Maritime and Crimean Shipping News

Felixstowe DockersCongratulations Anita who works tirelessly to support seafarers visiting Felixstowe.


The Haven Port Welfare Committee (PWC) Vice Chairman, Capt. Ashley Parker presented the Merchant Navy Welfare Board (MNWB) award for ‘Exceptional Service to Seafarers’ to Anita Mazur, Manager of Felixstowe and Haven Ports Seafarers Service. 

Congratulations Anita who works tirelessly to support seafarers visiting Felixstowe.






In the run-up to Christmas, we join a party at the Seafarers Centre, and meet new manager Sada Shah to hear about the work the centre does.



http://felixstowenews.tv


THE MISSION TO SEAFARERS FELIXSTOWE AND HAVEN PORTS







Welcome to Felixstowe and Haven Ports




Felixstowe DockersHow does your mental health influence your work performance?

Mental Health in the Workplace

Most likely you’ve heard about or discussed the topic of mental health online or with trusted family and friends, but how can mental health influence your performance at work? Many in the UK are faced with the effects of mental health issues in their daily lives but are also forced to face those challenges in the workplace. There is no uniform identity for mental health issues, and how those issues affect a person differ greatly - sometimes resulting in a variety of obstacles that can hinder the potential success for many. Unfortunately employees who are faced with the immense challenge of delivering positive results for a company along with confronting a mental health disorder often find themselves thinking that they are left to face the uphill battle alone.  
Through researching a number of recent national council surveys and reports, findcourses.co.uk has pulled some of the most prominent details and efforts that affect the UK workforce.
Take a look at findcourses.co.uk’s  infographic below to learn more on the signs of poor mental health and the influences that are prevalent in the workplace.

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If you'd like to add this infographic to your site, simply copy and paste the code below: